Gordon Brown

Spin returns

More and better laughs

Red tie man needs help Red tie man needs help
I can say for a fact I did not know that Mandelson was coming back but did write this in 'How to fix banking' see HERE.

I would imagine Brown has a soft spot for the EU and looks fondly upon the interventionist policies of its élite. While we could never describe Brown as a friend of Peter Mandelson he is, to use that weasel word, a colleague. As we know Mandelson is one of the EU élite and so all is well, or is it?

As Nulabour is so short of real talent that even David Miliband is touted as a future Leader and as Peter Mandelson was soon to be out of a job the moves, chess style, were there for the contemplative folk to ponder.

How to fix banking

'Everything', well almost

I'm on the way to the bank I'm on the way to the bank
Gordon Brown tells us he will do "everything it takes" to sort out the present crisis in the UK's banks. The Mr Fixit role appeals to him as he is by nature an interventionist. Gordon Brown loves the 'big state' way of working and has personally waited years to be the Prime Minister of such a thing. Many people thought that Brown's dislike of the euro indicated a dislike of the EU. Not so I suggest. I would imagine Brown has a soft spot for the EU and looks fondly upon the interventionist policies of its élite. While we could never describe Brown as a friend of Peter Mandelson he is, to use that weasel word, a colleague. As we know Mandelson is one of the EU élite and so all is well, or is it? What about another of the élite, European Union (EU) Competition Commissioner, Neelie Kroes? For Kroes has had words with Brian Cowen the Taoiseach of Ireland about his plan to give total security to deposits in Irish banks, see HERE.

Brown has not gone as far as Cowen with deposit safety and as a result there is a suggestion that money is already flowing into Ireland from UK accounts.

Clapped out?

Entertaining, up to a point

Our Leader Our Leader
So its all over, the Nulabour fest is over for another year. I have posted before on the madness of the political party conference. It appeals only to the party faithful and the MSM the ordinary voter is not the target audience here. So, you may ask, why bother? Sheer indulgence I say.

Having plenty to do the day of Gordon's big speech I ducked out of listening direct to it on BBC Radio 4. This task fell to my partner who had the radio on in the next room. So all I could hear was the hammy and theatrical droning of the great man but, due to the distance, not the words. There was also the audiences applause. It was the latter that almost dominated the sound from afar and to my reckoning was at least 40% of the air-time. And again due to the distance sounded not like clapping but rain on a tin roof! There was one particular feature of this event that broke my concentration of my task in hand more than any other. It was the choice of key words trotted out mantra-style by the PM.

Why do we put up with it?

A quiet week?

Lake Wobegon Lake Wobegon
In 'Lake Wobegon Days' the author Garrison Keillor always began an observation with: "it's been a quiet week in Lake Wobegon". Well it was a quiet week beginning 8th September 2008, very quiet, in fact we didn't notice a thing. I refer to the great non-news story of that week when the cabinet meeting was held right here in Birmingham and, for the first time in, well ages, so they say. Just what was the point of this, why did they do that? Personally it was a quiet day and I was working in the garden but I'm sure, in the fullness of time, my life will be the better for this Birmingham meeting. No, only kidding. But I think if Gordon Brown and his cabinet keep this sort of thing up then we will all start to feel sorry for them. Hang on, was that the reason? Then again we all deride the EU for shuffling back and forwards between Brussels and Strasbourg, we can only hope there is not too much gypsy in Gordon Brown otherwise we are stuck with this expensive and futile stunt as a regular feature.

Perhaps at the Birmingham meeting the details of how we can build an extension to our homes without planning permission, see HERE.

This has been promoted as a great help to us all in the depths of the credit crisis and the downturn in the property market.

Darling's Dilemma

Speak up or shut up?

Point out, speak out Point out, speak out
Our Chancellor, Alistair Darling, see right, has got himself into a spot of bother and all because of what he said in the Guardian, see HERE. Normally very generous to Nulabour heavies, the paper was rewarded with a quote or two which may in time, so we are told, come back to haunt him. But why? Was what Darling said a remark too far or is it the endorsement of what the man-in-the-street, 'our man', had known for ages? Namely that the UK economy is not in rude health now and it could get worse. If it is the latter then what we are not told, is why Darling lags behind 'our man' in terms of perception and speaking out; is Darling afraid and if so of what? If it is the former, a remark too far and so the classic gaffe, then 'our man' will wonder if Darling's honesty will cost him his job. After all 'our man' is worried about keeping his job, so why not have doubts about Darling keeping his job too? The chances are that those remarks are not one man's moment of madness and will not be forgotten. So how do other countries and their politicians square this circle, speak out or keep quiet?

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