So what does the name tee2i mean?

Well it's shorthand for the independence index. This blog takes independence seriously. There's no problem, in principle, with a country being part of a confederation or partnership, the UK is part of NATO. But the EU is a failing confederation and our independence is threatened by continued membership. But there's more to politics than the EU. Neither is politics all about leaning left or rightward on any issue, it's far more subtle than that. It's all down to the quality of life so let's aim high. It's our right to do so.

The story in pictures

Implausible plot but horrific outcome?

Merkel looks glum Merkel looks glum
Politics is weird and it numbs people, they turn off. Only a few people take it seriously and read as much as they can, some will not even look at the TV. A month ago, I startled a neighbour who told me her daughter was taking a holiday in Greece. Reacting to all the MSM reports I did a quick tour around the subject of strikes and demonstrations and wished the traveller well. That was the worst thing I could have done. The mother's face fell, rather than gearing herself up for the cat-sitting and plant watering she went straight into worry mode. How could, I though as I left the scene of my disaster, they not have noticed these things and wondered about the wisdom of taking the kids abroad? But it's not only ordinary people who get politics wrong and who fail to spot the important things.

It's been the same with the troubles in Greece. An example: the ordinary Greek has failed to spot the problem by thinking that the bailout terms are too harsh, while at the same time wanting to stay in the EU and stick with the euro. It's just mad, but then that's what the majority of Greeks are saying to the pollsters. Equally mad is that the pollsters then fail to ask who should give them money, and why, so they may carry on as they are. In fact it's not mad it's a joke, as were the actions of George Papandreou.

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Comedy, politics and St Paul's

Would Jesus have approved of the Greek bail-out?

Two ClericsTwo Clerics
They thought it was all over. The photographs from the EU summit on the euro crisis told it all. Puffy eyed and puffed up at their 'success' the EU elite posed for the camera. However, as expected, Nicholas Sarkozy got the best shot with his theatrical snub of David Cameron who, if he had any sense at all, must now wonder at the merit of sharing aircraft carriers with the French. The EU leaders enjoyed it, they may even have thought this moment would last forever. But no, for the EU elite has only touched the symptoms, the cure for the ills of the single currency are beyond their grasp and understanding. That is done by splitting up the eurozone, this they cannot contemplate for they are no more than Witch Doctors.

By contrast, for another group of stupid people it's already over but they have failed to spot this. The people involved with the protest camp at St Paul's Cathedral, both sides that is, seem unaware this sort of thing is now so dated that even the resignation of two of the clerical staff won't warm it it up to a palatable level. As the EU folk get more publicity than is good for them we will start with the Cathedral people.

Three wise men?

Actually no, fools on the make!

Liam Fox Liam Fox
Stories like the death of Gaddafi will, for a while, keep three men from the public gaze. For as we suggested the party political season was a bit of failure this year. Low on politics but high on laughs, it was all so silly. Then real politics came back with a bang, a bit like waiting for a bus as three interesting cases came along at once. This time it was the Tories who started it. Defence Secretary Liam Fox was caught being, well being Liam Fox, wanting it both ways if you like. Fox was followed by another Tory, the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice since May 2010, Jonathan Djanogly. Like Fox, Djanogly also seemed to have a problem playing a straight bat, muddling his public and private duties. Next along was Liberal Democrat MP Mike Hancock, his problem was a simple leg-over affair. Alas the silly man chose a Russian spy for his entertainment. So three men and three cases.

'Tis the season of the year

Not relevant but funny, sort of

William Hague 1977William Hague 1977
Well it's all over. The party political conference season, or conference as it's now called, has finished. A while back Richard North declared his disinterest in it all. However, you might have thought, if you think in trendy sound bites, that the first coalition in a long time would have heralded a new era in UK politics. That this would lead to post adversarial politics and onwards and upwards to the permanently sunny uplands. In a word, no. This is not the case. The death of adversarial politics has been exaggerated. The 'new era' is simply confirmation that conventional domestic politics has been overcome by the confederation effect, the EU. Our national politicians have nothing to do but fight amongst themselves. An in-party adversarial trend that delights the MSM as, without this they would have nothing to do, nothing to report.

In some respects only a few people could have spotted the difference between the three tribes of nerds that took part in this now very dated ritual. Also all three parties were very lucky in the timing of their efforts to impress us. The first to go were the Liberal Democrats. Held in Birmingham their bash was hard for locals to spot. No extra traffic in the streets nor anything exciting occurred, in or out of the venue.

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Broken Britain?

The authorities, whose side are they on?

Scared of this, why? Scared of this, why?
For many people Hackgate had become boring. Hence, or so it would seem, the outburst of activity that we now call, 'the riots', was so joyfully seized upon. In Hackgate the hapless trio, MPs, the MSM and the police proved to the public how evil gangs fighting turf wars can ruin lives. So how unfortunate that the back streets of some cities thought it was their turn to do the same. Only the very foolish and naive were shocked by the revelations of Hackgate or taken aback by the riots and the post-riot recriminations.

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