So what does the name tee2i mean?

Well it's shorthand for the independence index. This blog takes independence seriously. There's no problem, in principle, with a country being part of a confederation or partnership, the UK is part of NATO. But the EU is a failing confederation and our independence is threatened by continued membership. But there's more to politics than the EU. Neither is politics all about leaning left or rightward on any issue, it's far more subtle than that. It's all down to the quality of life so let's aim high. It's our right to do so.

Three wise men?

Actually no, fools on the make!

Liam Fox Liam Fox
Stories like the death of Gaddafi will, for a while, keep three men from the public gaze. For as we suggested the party political season was a bit of failure this year. Low on politics but high on laughs, it was all so silly. Then real politics came back with a bang, a bit like waiting for a bus as three interesting cases came along at once. This time it was the Tories who started it. Defence Secretary Liam Fox was caught being, well being Liam Fox, wanting it both ways if you like. Fox was followed by another Tory, the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice since May 2010, Jonathan Djanogly. Like Fox, Djanogly also seemed to have a problem playing a straight bat, muddling his public and private duties. Next along was Liberal Democrat MP Mike Hancock, his problem was a simple leg-over affair. Alas the silly man chose a Russian spy for his entertainment. So three men and three cases.

'Tis the season of the year

Not relevant but funny, sort of

William Hague 1977William Hague 1977
Well it's all over. The party political conference season, or conference as it's now called, has finished. A while back Richard North declared his disinterest in it all. However, you might have thought, if you think in trendy sound bites, that the first coalition in a long time would have heralded a new era in UK politics. That this would lead to post adversarial politics and onwards and upwards to the permanently sunny uplands. In a word, no. This is not the case. The death of adversarial politics has been exaggerated. The 'new era' is simply confirmation that conventional domestic politics has been overcome by the confederation effect, the EU. Our national politicians have nothing to do but fight amongst themselves. An in-party adversarial trend that delights the MSM as, without this they would have nothing to do, nothing to report.

In some respects only a few people could have spotted the difference between the three tribes of nerds that took part in this now very dated ritual. Also all three parties were very lucky in the timing of their efforts to impress us. The first to go were the Liberal Democrats. Held in Birmingham their bash was hard for locals to spot. No extra traffic in the streets nor anything exciting occurred, in or out of the venue.

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Broken Britain?

The authorities, whose side are they on?

Scared of this, why? Scared of this, why?
For many people Hackgate had become boring. Hence, or so it would seem, the outburst of activity that we now call, 'the riots', was so joyfully seized upon. In Hackgate the hapless trio, MPs, the MSM and the police proved to the public how evil gangs fighting turf wars can ruin lives. So how unfortunate that the back streets of some cities thought it was their turn to do the same. Only the very foolish and naive were shocked by the revelations of Hackgate or taken aback by the riots and the post-riot recriminations.

Transport, jobs and politics, are we on the right track?

Cameron is in another fine mess of his own making

BREL built locoBREL built loco
The news about the problems at locomotive builder Bombardier leading to the closure of the Derby works brought forth a range or reactions; the ritual gnashing of teeth being the one the MSM liked best. However, the first wave of reporting left out as much of this story as it reported. A typical MSM headline talking about Bombardier as 'the UK's last train maker' was not an incorrect statement but it would be wrong to try to pass off Bombardier as the last British train maker, for it is an enormous Canadian company. So the 1,400 jobs at the Derby HQ, while vital to Derbyshire, are perhaps no more than natural employee flows over the whole of the company on a global basis.

Let the light shine upon them

Hackgate and the public servants.

James Anderton, the original celebrity cop.James Anderton, the original celebrity cop.
Yet more on the story now called Hackgate. This is not an unimportant story but is, as suggested HERE , a media storm. Clearly the MSM assume their readers can't get enough. In the case of the BBC and the Guardian the line is 'watch out for that evil Rupert Murdoch'. Yet the facts show the liberal-left section of the MSM get things wrong too. Hence the Guardian was forced to apologise to the Sun for getting their facts seriously wrong.

However, other sections of the MSM fight their own battles. Wise people are looking long term on this; what restrictions on press freedom may follow Hackgate? David Cameron has said he wants a free press but then he says all sorts of things which never come to pass. His other problem is the Deputy PM Nick Clegg. The Liberal Democrats are ill named and can be expected to join with Ed Milband and the Labour party in calling for measures to 'stop Murdoch'. A liberal, in the real sense, and free press is not what they want.

So an alternative take on all of this comes via the blogosphere.

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