So what does the name tee2i mean?

Well it's shorthand for the independence index. This blog takes independence seriously. There's no problem, in principle, with a country being part of a confederation or partnership, the UK is part of NATO. But the EU is a failing confederation and our independence was threatened by membership, so we voted to leave. There's also the independence of thought which must, obviously, lead to free speech. The popularity of cancel culture must be challenged. Also politics is more than about leaning left or rightward on any issue, it's far more subtle than that. It's all down to the quality of life so let's aim high. It's our right to do so.

Perhaps it was Domophobia?

Will the Government help fight the culture wars?

Dom, coming up roses!Dom, coming up roses!
What is the UK press up to, what does it do? Not so long ago the press went into meltdown over Dominic Cummings and his trip to the farm in County Durham owned by his father. It was fun while it lasted, for them. They love a witch hunt and here was a great opportunity, it also meshed with the culture wars they are so keen for us to learn about. To the press Cummings is special as he is seen to be more powerful than they are; or that's what they think and these thoughts count for a lot of the aggro. Cummings went to Oxford, privileged eh? No not really Emily Maitlis went to Cambridge and she is, 'one of us'. Reports suggest that while at Oxford Cummings was next to invisible in that he did very few of the things students are noted for. So, no sport and not for him a position in the Oxford Union or nights out with the boys from the Bullingdon Club.He seemed only to study and was seen as a loner, there are even whispers that a senior academic with connections to MI6 was impressed by Cummings.

After graduation he worked in Russia for a few years and is fluent in the language. Back in the UK he began his ever upward journey in politics. Working for Business for Sterling then briefly for the Conservative party he eventually ran a think tank. Next he was involved in working against setting up the North-East Regional Assembly.

What ever happened to the Budget?

The pandemic goes economic, who will win who will pay?

New blue tree! New blue tree!
In the first budget by Chancellor Rishi Sunak we saw a new species of tree. A new tree? Yes we did! Gone is the Labour party money tree the mythical giver of low hanging fruit for all and in its place stood the mighty Blue tree. This is a cross between a hardy traditional Oak and some fancy hybrid that just keeps on giving. But then days later from Sunak came the measures to deal with Covid-19. Here was not so much a money tree but a forest. Confused? You are not alone! The first question must be was the Government caught out by the spread of C-19 and if so why? At the moment we are so busy dealing with the virus the lessons will come later. Thinking about budgets as recently as Nov 2019 the Labour party was taken to task for its money tree promises to spend, spend, spend. But that is what we now see and very late in this Covid-19 crisis we also see questions being asked about this spending. Can you really out-spend a pandemic? A spending spree is such a tempting thing for a government to do. But if it goes wrong then it opens the door for your political opponents. So to stop this political to-and-fro Tony Blair gave us fiscal rules. The idea was to lift the financial management of the nation away from political pressure. What could go wrong? Well plenty, it was as most things with Blair an act, a delusion.

Looking at Post-Brexit Ireland

A review of our relations with more of our neighbours

When Irish eyes are smiling....When Irish eyes are smiling.... Taoiseach Leo Varadkar has resigned so let's have a look at Irish politics; not just in Eire but the whole lot of it including Ulster. It was both the luck of the Irish and Leo Varadkar that Brexit came along when it did; the former could continue to play victim, they always do, while the latter hid behind it and went in for endless Brit-bashing. This hid the fact that Varadkar had little to offer in the way of policies but eventually there came an election and Varadkar and his party did badly. We should remember this was his first general election too as the previous Taoiseach, Enda Kenny, stood down while in office and there was a leadership election that Varadkar narrowly won and he set out to make his mark. Enda Kenny was a politician of substance in that he came from a political family and had many years of experience. The Brexit referendum was just a year before Kenny stood down and he had made a point about Brexit being awkward for Ireland in a rather cack-handed way. He had also dialled in the Peace Process, another handy tool that is used by many to lever an argument their way even if the logic is flawed and the context fatuous.

Kenny was denounced by the UK government for: "scaremongering of the worst possible kind". However, it was now time for Varadkar to get noticed.

Are we about to say goodbye?

A university: expensive, low value and bad business?

Linus Pauling - 1922Linus Pauling - 1922
There is much wrong with the UK education sector. So, is the National Union of Students an indicator of further trouble in the world of education? We are told that the NUS could be bankrupt and forced to close. So the pantomime begins, there have been 'anti-austerity' demonstrations by students and altogether it looks rather ridiculous. Recently a vote at Plymouth University showed around 52% of the students opted to leave the NUS, oddly there has been no accusation, 'they did not know what they were voting for', neither a demand for a 'student People's Vote to prevent an 'injustice'.

So what of the NUS and is it just part of a higher education problem? It was formed in 1922 from several groups with similar interests. The original purpose was to lobby for students and to give them, in modern parlance, a voice. Even in those far-off days politics was not far below the surface many students eyed the rise of radical politics in other parts of the world, pronounced this was good and so the love of communism took off in the student world. From the start this created tension within the movement. Individual universities have on occasions voted to leave the NUS on this score, only to rejoin later when another group of hopefuls took over the reins of student power within the university.

And so to UKIP.

A short history of UKIP and other things.

Dr Alan Sked 1993 Dr Alan Sked 1993
Nigel Farage is to start another party. In time we will see if this is to put one across the bows of Gerard Batten and 'old' UKIP, or if there is something else going on. The rivalry between these two could well be the force that causes both great damage. Also for long term Farage watchers there is a hark back to old times with the announcement that Annunziata Rees-Mogg, sister of leading Conservative Brexiteer MP Jacob Rees-Mogg will stand alongside Farage. In 2004 Farage announced that TV celebrity Robert Kilroy-Silk had joined UKIP. It was if Farage had played an ace in a game of cards as nobody in the party outside of the Farage inner circle knew this was coming up. However, in another nine months Kilroy-Silk had left UKIP, game over. But we live in strange times with the date for leaving the EU now put back and both the main parties in disarray Farage is not the only person to think change is needed. A small number of MPs have left their roots in Labour and the Conservatives to form an independent group which is in the throes of turning itself into a party. Although due to both circumstances and the people involved not much has happened yet. After an initial flourish of interest from the media there was the ritual period of ridicule.

Syndicate content