A war of words

Who will rescue the armed services?

A tank transporter A tank transporter
Did you spot the spat? Not content with the latest military opportunity- bombing Libya, two of our military men decided to go head-to-head. Put simply the navy man said we can't go on like this but the army man disagreed, see HERE .

While all this was going on, the RAF bloke was either ominously or sensibly quiet. The public notice things like that. They also wonder at this daft code of discipline that the military adhere to. If, for example, there is a problem then you could say the navy man had a duty to speak up. Then again perhaps the RAF man will wait until he can see the winner of this army/navy fight, then join the winning side. This would be called strategic thinking, the sort of stuff learnt on officer training courses. Mind you he might have learnt this trick from all that effort that's gone into Afghanistan. There the warring tribes do just the same thing, join the winning side, so all that effort wasn't wasted after all. We have posted about this inter-service rivalry before.

Blogger at the Frontline

North on the war

General Sir Richard Dannatt General Sir Richard Dannatt
Dr Richard North, co-founder of the website EU Referendum, see HERE has anti-EU politics as his 'day job' He also has carved a niche for himself as an analyst of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and runs another blog, Defence of the Realm to deal specifically with this subject.

Tony Blair's wars were always a bit of a hotchpotch and lay somewhere between pure vanity and the evangelical with just a nod to strategy. North concentrates on Iraq and shows that the mistakes in Iraq were not recognised early enough, lessons were not learnt and so there is a risk of them being carried over into Afghanistan.

North's book, The Ministry of Defeat - The British War in Iraq, 2003 – 2009 has just been released and North was invited to the Frontline Club to talk about the subject and take questions. The occasion was supposed to be a proper debate with a full range of speakers, including General Sir Mike Jackson. But Jackson pulled out at the last moment for reasons not made fully clear.

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