So what does the name tee2i mean?

Well it's shorthand for the independence index. This blog takes independence seriously. There's no problem, in principle, with a country being part of a confederation or partnership, the UK is part of NATO. But the EU is a failing confederation and our independence is threatened by continued membership. But there's more to politics than the EU. Neither is politics all about leaning left or rightward on any issue, it's far more subtle than that. It's all down to the quality of life so let's aim high. It's our right to do so.

It's the world we live in - part 2

More on the public services

Rambo to the rescue? Rambo to the rescue?

Part 1 was posted before the results of the PCC elections. But even then it was obvious things where not going well, the results show the predicted low-turnout was true with many districts only just into double figures. Naturally a brave face was put on by the promoters of this idea, however, it will take a long time for the idea of elected local officials to recover from this set back. But that, as we suggested, is what some people wanted. The awful Sir Ian Blair is pleased, the former head of the Metropolitan Police, now wasting public money in the House of Lords spoke against the idea. And proved, if proof where needed, that the police force needs reforming.

However, the cherry on the cake was Blair's fellow traveller and equally awful, John Prescott, did not get elected as Hull PCC. This was despite, or even perhaps because ex-PM Tony Blair, 'helped' Prescott in Hull. As usual Blair confirmed our opinions of him, in the case of the statement about Prescott that he has 'lost none of his old magic' was nothing to do with Prescott but all about himself. As might be expected marmalade John, 'thick cut' fell for it, one might even feel sorry for him! However, the name Bliar was so apt for the ex-PM, then and now.

The BBC

What's wrong with Auntie?

Philosopher Bertrand Russell Philosopher Bertrand Russell
The BBC, it's a job to know where to start. People fresh to taking a look at the corporation as opposed to their programmes can be forgiven for thinking that the present critical mood is all down to the headline problems. Oh no, that would be wrong! Yes it's true that the Jimmy Savile revelations along with the '28 gates' , see HERE and other scandals are the centre of attention. But there's far more to it than just this and it goes much further back than the time Savile worked for the BBC. An organisation is, especially so in the case of the BBC, defined by its people. Those who work for the BBC want to do so, they do not arrive by accident. Also they tend to stay working for the BBC. Few people are sacked and it absorbs them while in return they become the BBC.

The BBC is a bit like the Vatican, surrounded by Italy but deemed fully independent. The BBC, the state broadcaster, is surrounded by the state that keeps it alive and upon which it is dependent but regards itself as wholly free from it. The relationship has nothing to do with allegiance or with responsibility to the people of the state.

Why do they put up with it?

The victim gives way to the bully, as usual, but they are both to blame

The Jarrow March The Jarrow March
The latest bit of political speak comes from the Tory party. Timed to coincide with their recent conference we get the 'suspicious striver'.. What are they? Well possibly the answer to the Tory party prayer and let Lord Ashcroft explain in his own words.

“Suspicious Strivers”, who make up 15% of the population, have many of the attitudes that Conservatives might think make them natural supporters. They might even be thought of as the natural successors to the C2 voters that Margaret Thatcher won from Labour in the 1980s. They tend to think people expect too much from government, oppose penalising top earners with very high taxes, and value flexible labour markets. But Suspicious Strivers are so called because they are not sure their efforts will bring the rewards they should. They suspect that hard work counts for less than connections, and are sensitive to signals that striving goes unrewarded, or even counts against them, when they miss out on help which, as they see it, they would get if they worked less hard. They are the least likely of any group to identify with a political party, and have the highest UKIP vote – another symptom of their dissatisfaction with mainstream politics.

The wonderful world of business

Waiting for the recovery? It will be a long wait with this lot!

Wonderful! Wonderful!
So with the Olympics over people who find sport boring won't remember who won what but might recall that it was G4S who caused a stir by making a mess of their contract to provide security staff for the Olympics and that compensating arrangements had to be made, such as calling in the army. One of the outcomes to all this was the head man at G4S, Nick Buckles, got told off by the Labour MP Keith Vaz, who chairs the Commons Home Affairs Select Committee. Now there is a certain irony here as one person whose recent performance fell short of acceptable is questioned by another who, in the past, had the same problem! The questioning of Buckles led to the ridiculous claim by Neil Woodford, an investment manager at Invesco Perpetual, that -

the aggressive response of MPs to the Olympics security shambles put recovery at risk by discouraging businesses to come to Britain --------- last month’s Home Affairs Select Committee meeting was like watching “a medieval persecution” ---------- if this is the way Parliament wants to treat business, please Parliament, don’t be surprised when businesses decide this isn’t the country for them,

What a stupid man!

It's the world we live in - part 1

Looking at the way the police and other public servants perform.

The lovely Robin Hood airportThe lovely Robin Hood airport
So you want to be a Commissioner for the Police? That's the new fangled job that's going nowhere at the moment. Alarm bells are being sounded, and not just by the Tory faithful. And who is to blame for that you may ask? Reports like these - HERE and HERE show that the bar has been set very high, and rumours suggest this may be deliberate. Theresa May is keen for you to know that it was not supposed to turn out this way. But it has. It is on record that the police did not want this idea and sought to rubbish it when it was in the early stages prior to the general election. So are we seeing the end result of 'friends in high places?'

The very idea of elected police commissioners ruffled many feathers, not least in ACPO, an organisation never shy of going in for political manoeuvres. Put simply there is nothing wrong with the general public having a say upon who is to be serving them. The police, like so many other people, are public servants.

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