So what does the name tee2i mean?

Well it's shorthand for the independence index. This blog takes independence seriously. There's no problem, in principle, with a country being part of a confederation or partnership, the UK is part of NATO. But the EU is a failing confederation and our independence is threatened by continued membership. But there's more to politics than the EU. Neither is politics all about leaning left or rightward on any issue, it's far more subtle than that. It's all down to the quality of life so let's aim high. It's our right to do so.

Somerset gives way to Ukraine

The EU, no money and no diplomacy!

Russian tank memorial in the UkraineRussian tank memorial in the Ukraine
So floods and why they happened and the role of the EU are yesterday's news. It's ironic that they were pushed off the front page by events in the Ukraine. In the Telegraph Liam Halligan wrote -

These protests began relatively peacefully back in November, when Yanukovych refused to sign a trade deal with the European Union. Again, many Ukrainians opposed this deal, not least because it demanded full market access for EU goods, without in turn granting Ukraine permission to export much of its farm produce to western Europe.

So far the EU and its apologists have managed to convince many people of the simplicity of the crisis in the Ukraine. Some Ukrainians are good, they want the EU while others are wicked, they want to remain aligned with Russia. This gross over simplification has been helped along by the usual suspects. Both the BBC and the Guardian seem only able to find quotes from Ukrainians who follow this line. But then it was much the same when the reports of unrest from Ireland and Greece came in. The problems, according to those interviewed by the media were many but only the lightest criticism of the EU was broadcast.

Floods for all?

Let's pretend the EU had nothing to do with this!

Pumps from Holland, and the carbon footprint is? Pumps from Holland, and the carbon footprint is?
When it comes to something tricky you can't beat an expert. As for the floods alas experts to help us prevent them seem to be in short supply. But the flooding of the Somerset Levels has been watched over by Christopher Booker and his vantage point has been his home, he lives in a Somerset village. So not only is he our man on the spot but an acknowledged authority on the EU. The flooding of the Levels is one of those EU ideas so we are in good hands with Booker. Who very often teams up with Richard North and it is the North blog that gives us what we need. North has pulled together the work of Booker and others, added his own and it is an ideal starting point. Naturally technical so heavy reading lies ahead but well worth the effort.

The MSM have done a different job, as they do. Pictures of elderly people in rubber boats being taken to safety by the authorities tell their own story. But what of the various organisations involved? Leo McKinstry had this to say. Naturally the supporters of big government, and the Environmental Agency is huge, are in a quandary. How to help the likes of Chris Smith, now Lord Smith of the EA, but without getting the wrong side of public opinion?

in

2014, a new year but old propoganda

Will this year mark a watershed in tolerance for old myths?

Do you want ice with that? Do you want ice with that?
So after years of singing the praises of the EU, traditionally seen as the cure of all evils, the Labour party finally gets the message. While in the interests of honest reporting the Guardian puts these pearls of wisdom on the front page! Mind you, I suppose we should have seen it coming. When in between 'saving' the world banking system and selling off the UK gold reserves for a low price Gordon Brown came out with the helpful remark, 'British jobs for British workers'. And it has been downhill ever since. The very idea that there might be votes in this for the Labour party is hypocrisy of the worst sort. We may only assume that Labour took their cue from David Cameron who has yet again shown poor leadership on the same subject.

What is interesting is that many of the comments in the Guardian from readers make it plain that they are not keen on the latest influx of migrants from Romania and Bulgaria. Quite how far this goes remains to be seen but it's not very PC is it? It looks like an increasing number of people have lost their fear and reverence of the EU and having seen the light are now ready to criticise it.

Bank bad public good?

Risk transfer, and they did not ask us

It's a bargain!It's a bargain!
'Too big to fail', was a popular way for banks to portray themselves, until that is, the public had to bail them out following the financial crisis. Several years on and the Royal Bank of Scotland, now in better health due to all that public money, is running an advert related to George Osborne's 'help to buy' scheme. This is so funny.

First a ridiculous style of management took RBS, and other lenders, to the brink and did so in an era of property price expansion that was encouraged by government. Then, when it had gone wrong, and without any consultation the public were signed up to a rescue plan and so 'bought' RBS. Now some years later and again without consultation the public are helping again.

This time it will be different, so they say! House prices are too high in relation to typical incomes, especially so in the London and South East of the UK. Furthermore, it has been impossible to see any government policy since the downturn began that would alter this. It would be more honest for the present government to admit this rather than tinker with the problem.

Buying anything comes with a risk, there's no reason why property should be different. It's the duty of the purchaser to evaluate the risk and traditionally it was this caution that helped to stabilise the market. And in extreme cases act to lower prices.

The faithful servant

Marxism, spinners and the BBC

Damian Mcbride, the one on the left Damian Mcbride, the one on the left

The life of the energy producers been tranquil until Ed Miliband bared his teeth at the Labour party conference. They did business upon the back of barmy green energy policies that Miliband's party, spinners and MPs alike, had endorsed. But before that moment we had all been agog at the sight of Damian McBride basking in the limelight. It has suited the MSM and McBride's publisher to paint him as a bad boy. But he is not. He is a faithful servant and there is more to him than you might think.

If we go back to the dawn of Nulabour the three central characters were: Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and Peter Mandelson. In time a pattern emerged with each of those three being associated with their sidekick-cum-spinner. Blair and Alastair Campbell merged to become the double act of the world's most deluded smarmy git and his Northern thug. It's hard to say that McBride is wicked but pretend that Campbell was not working the same trade, because he was then and is now.

The BBC finding that Blair is now beyond their reach uses Campbell as a stop-gap; a sort of cheap-and-cheerful elder statesman who can deliver the 'I was there' history lesson and rent a quote without blushing. Mandelson's sidekick was Benjamin Wegg-Prosser and, like Blair and Campbell, they too followed the money and still work together.

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