So what does the name tee2i mean?

Well it's shorthand for the independence index. This blog takes independence seriously. There's no problem, in principle, with a country being part of a confederation or partnership, the UK is part of NATO. But the EU is a failing confederation and our independence is threatened by continued membership. But there's more to politics than the EU. Neither is politics all about leaning left or rightward on any issue, it's far more subtle than that. It's all down to the quality of life so let's aim high. It's our right to do so.

Victory for whom?

The Labour party leadership election, cathartic, chaotic or both?

Long ago and far away Corbyn gets arrested! Long ago and far away Corbyn gets arrested!
In May of this year Ed Miliband and the Labour Party lost the general election and Miliband resigned. It's not fair to pin all the blame on him but this has to be the starting point for looking at the win by Jeremy Corbyn of the Labour party leadership election. Miliband did however, and perhaps unintentionally, do both Corbyn and his party a favour by introducing the £3 membership idea.

Some estimates say membership is rising at a faster rate than at any time since the second world war when Clement Attlee came to power and now stands at 554,272 members and we know that 251,417 voted for Corbyn. Naturally the Corbynistas will say 'if only our man had been in charge in May'. But it's not that simple. Corbyn came in late to the contest with a bit of a fanfare from some in his party who wanted the election hustings to brighten up. They hoped he would swing the contest towards the other candidates but the opposite happened.

But the original idea at least showed a bit feeling for the public, if you look at the votes for the other three candidates they only total 171,247, without Corbyn the interest shown in the contest would have been reduced. Second placed Andy Burnham was simply revolting, being all that was wrong with not only Labour but also in UK politics generally.

The general election and beyond.

The age of austerity or plenty, so we are told but who will decide?

Douglas Carswell Douglas Carswell

The general election result. Some seasoned political analysts, who had the benefit of experience got it right, so they tell us, and could see the result for David Cameron coming. On the other hand it might be like guessing the weight of the cake at a fund-raising event, someone gets the prize, always, even if it is a guess! Then there was the skewed system that gave the SNP all those seats but UKIP just one. This problem is admitted by the Electoral Commission but it remains to be seen what will follow. There is also the turmoil for the losers as new leaders are selected for the opposition parties. Let's start with the SNP 'victory', which like the result for Cameron is not quite what it seems.

Prior to the election Hugo Rifkind did a good job of explaining what he sees in the SNP approach. It's all very well constantly spoiling for a fight, as they do, but for the fact that you cannot win them all. Alex Salmond has gone from ex-leader to attack dog, his comments following the death of Charles Kennedy have done neither himself or his party any favours.

Scotland, NO means NO?

Alex Salmond, the luck runs out and there never was a plan, sunk?

Salmond and the SNP sunk?Salmond and the SNP sunk?
So Scotland voted NO? In general when dealing with politics it's wise to stick to facts. Over on EUReferendum Richard North has crunched the numbers and neither David Cameron nor Alex Salmond can claim they have the full support of their people and so act 'on their behalf'.

The trigger for the current referendum was, of course, David Cameron, who became prime minister in 2010 on the back of a 36.1 percent Conservative vote, on a turnout of 65.1 percent, giving him a mandate of 23.5 percent. 

In the Scottish Parliament election, though, the turnout was a mere 50 percent, and Mr Salmond with his SNP, the driver of yesterday's referendum, snuck in on a list vote of 44 percent, picking up a mandate of 22 percent. 

This blog has always had doubts about a Scottish referendum with Salmond involved. Back in 2007 we published this, all these years later what we wrote then still holds -

Surely an independent country responsible for its own affairs is also responsible for its own revenue? Relying on taxpayers from abroad, the English, would not be an option.

Charismatic conflict

How to suceed at moral outrage without trying for the easily confused

A rise in anti-semitismA rise in anti-semitism
Richard North, the one man power house behind the blog, EUReferendum, had a moan the other day,

Despite the legacy media maintaining its policy of reporting only one foreign crisis at a time, with Iraq being the fashionable crisis for the moment, serious events are unfolding in Ukraine.

He is so right about that. It is the speed and fickleness of the media and the 'popular opinion' they feed and feed on that stands out. No so long ago all attention was on Gaza. Opinions were formed with astonishing rapidity and without time for analysis or reflection. So that one had to conclude not much more than pure fashion was the motive. All that mattered, or so it seemed, was the arithmetic, the number of dead. This was ridiculous as the counting had not been given the same prominence throughout the conflict in Syria.

Then along came the crisis in Iraq. So it was goodbye Gaza and all the other trouble spots. And yet the arithmetic in Ukraine, the number killed, now equals Gaza. It is thanks to the environmentalists , who may well be the same people who tramped through London shouting anti-semitism that we get charismatic species, 'save the whale' for example. And now we have charismatic conflict. Where's 'Stop the War' when you need them?

Gove versus May

It was much more than a cabinet spat

Ray Honeyford - 1984Ray Honeyford - 1984

It started off simply and it's only just begun, but the battle of words between Home Secretary Theresa May and Education Minister Michael Gove runs deep. This story has been taken down from the front pages of national newspapers and ironically fighting between rival Islamic factions in the Middle East played a big part in its removal. For anyone who has followed the Islamification of the UK this event has been illuminating. Initially it looked to be all about schools, but there was more. They public have felt abandoned as they watched the root causes of the dispute happen and have had to put up with the consequences in cities all across the UK. It has been convenient for large sections of the media to paint Gove as a neocon. May tripped up very early on this we can see with her remark implying that the problem with schools in Birmingham began in 2010. No it did not. If May and her counter-terrorism 'experts' really think this is so then this explains a lot. So where is the origin of this?

We could go back to the Ray Honeyford case of the mid-1980s. This was in Bradford but other cities could equally well have behaved the same way. Bradford also led the way with the problems following the publication of The Satanic Verses.

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