On the march

The police, the cuts and more

On the marchOn the march
It was not a good time for the police to march through London to protest about 'the cuts'. The same week the revelations following the trial of men in Rochdale for 'grooming' under-age girls for sex included the fact that the police had known of this and other cases for at least ten years. They had, however, not taken any action for fear of being accused of being racist, or at least this is what we are told. The immediate post-trial reactions of many people, not just the police, followed the usual path. Blame shift and denial, outrage and fresh threats of racist accusations were the basis of this phase. But we start with former MP Ann Cryer, for many years seen by her own party, Labour, and the liberal left elite as a bit of a liability for her campaigns on, amongst other things, forced marriage in UK Asian society.

It is said that she passed on information to the police, but nothing was done. Other people researching the darker side of UK Asian culture, female genital mutilation for example, have had a similar tale to tell. Nothing happens, nothing is done, statistics are not known or not admitted to. It gives credence to the idea that the police were inactive because they were terrified of a backlash and being accused of racism. That is pathetic.

A police force bound not by the law but by a fear of upsetting someone is not worth having. But then again as a society we inch closer to such a thing, upsetting someone, being made illegal. Recent cases that have gone to courts include the student who suggested a police horse was gay and the youth who shouted 'woof' at a neighbour's dog.

As there used to be, in law, such a thing as 'wasting police time' you do wonder at the decision- making powers of a police force which not only wastes its own time but includes other public bodies too. Naturally, the cost to the long-suffering public is ignored. And, of course, in this mad world then you can be sure that ACPO, the Association of Chief Police Officers, would want to be on the side of the angels, the liberal elite pushing such an agenda.

Again it was poor timing that had the police on the march as the Leveson Inquiry dragged on. However it has never been stated as to when the inquiry will turn to look at the role of the police involved with the bribery. You do begin to wonder if it will ever happen. Police malpractice is such a big subject it's hard to know what to include and what to leave out. But consider the campaigners like Cryer, some of them claim they have been trying to get the police to act for at least ten years. Now all that time ago the police had all the political friends they could have wanted. Money came their way in floods, they got what they wanted with no trouble at all, the age of plenty! So why no action on these contentious subjects? It's obvious, therefore, money is not an issue. So a march now bleating about the cuts just won't do. It's risible. We can also look at the infamous Operation Ore. The Register has said -

Britain’s biggest ever computer crime investigation, Operation Ore, was flawed by a catalogue of “discrepancies, errors and uncertainties”, disclosed reports of two national police conferences seen by The Register reveal.

Interestingly this investigation was also claimed by the police to be underfunded yet was part of the age of plenty! It was ill managed and seemed to depend on nothing more than a toxic mix of hysteria and gung ho attitudes to propel it forward. Comparing it to the Rochdale case we see that the latter also relied upon madness, the hysterical aversion to dealing with race related issues in a proper manner. It must also be pointed out that with Operation Ore the police were concerned about people LOOKING at images of child abuse but in Rochdale it was the real thing. Under-age girls were having sex with men, with all the risks of disease, pregnancy and other abuse that entails. A simple question - how do the police weigh their actions and decisions in not just these types of cases but in the general run of their work?

Furthermore, we see that the Stephen Lawrence case continues to alarm decent people. The Independent Police Complaints Commission, IPCC, is looking again at files and reports going back to the 1980s that may not have been made available to the 1998 Sir William Macpherson inquiry.

Documents were said to focus on the conduct and integrity of former Metropolitan Police commander Ray Adams, who was involved in the probe into the murder - Some of the allegations against Mr Adams centred on his relationship with Kenneth Noye, who was later convicted of a separate murder. During the Macpherson inquiry, lawyers claimed Noye had a criminal associate, Clifford Norris, whose son David was a prime suspect in the murder of Stephen. David Norris and Gary Dobson were convicted of Stephen's murder in January this year - 19 years after the crime - and sentenced to life at the Old Bailey.

Yet again poor timing by the police, in the week they chose to heckle and jeer at the Home Secretary, Theresa May, Sam Hallam is released from jail. In the Hallam case the evidence proving his innocence was not difficult to find. This seems to be a feature of many cases of miscarriage of justice. We can forget most of what we see in cop films concerning the supra-intellectual stuff in gathering evidence as, generally, it's not like that at all.

Typically, at the root of a miscarriage of justice is pressure from the media to 'solve' a crime that has caught the public attention. What seems to happen is the MSM as purveyors of hysteria to the public rely on, and even pay, the police for printable information. This is why the Leveson Inquiry, so far, has been a farce as this has not been looked into. The very fact the the police cannot withstand this pressure and fall willingly into line to be paid, just like the reporters, is the real scandal. Also we should remember that 8 years in prison for a crime you did not commit is not a very long time compared with other cases, see HERE .
Ali Dizaei Ali Dizaei
However, back to the police conference at Bournemouth one doughty defender of the public bellowed from the floor that the Home Secretary was"a disgrace" and was no longer trusted by the police. Oh how funny is that? For what PC Shouty overlooked was the real problem, namely that the public not longer trust the police. Via democracy we can get rid of elected politicians we don't like but are stuck with a failing police force. Where's the justice in that!

But then again perhaps ACPO are, at this very moment are lobbying parliament for appearing to be a disgrace in front of a police officer an arrestable offence! Then again good job he did not shout "woof" at her dog! This very stupid officer has confirmed the opinion of an increasing number of the general public, that police only think of themselves and they are no longer trusted by the public. As they, by virtue of their actions at the conference, begin to look like the Marxist wing of some minor teaching trade union, being petulant and lacking in judgement.

But back to the Rochdale case, in a way this came as no surprise. For not only do the police seem to be unable to work across the racial width of society, coming to a dead stop when they get to Asian culture but you do wonder about some Asian police officers and their approach to the work they do. This website has long ago posted some examples of very disturbing attitudes. Here's what we wrote in 2008 -

Several women’s groups, particularly in the Midlands and northern England, say they are often reluctant to go to the police with women who have run away to escape violence because they cannot trust Asian police officers. Zalikha Ahmed, director of the Apna Haq refuge, says: “We have to be careful with them especially the Asian ones. We don’t visit the station when certain Asian officers are on because some of them are perpetrators, and one of them on record said that he would not arrest someone who used force on his wife. Some of them would just expose us for what we do.” Another worker in a women’s group in the North, who requested anonymity for safety reasons, said: “We had instances when a [Asian] chief inspector offered his help to a family by tracking a girl down – we were appalled."

As mentioned before,in the Hallam case the evidence proving his innocence was not difficult to find. This seems to be a feature of many cases of miscarriage of justice. We can forget most of what we see in cop films concerning the supra-intellectual stuff in gathering evidence as, generally, it's not like that at all. Typically, at the root of a miscarriage of justice is pressure from the media to 'solve' a crime that has caught the public attention. What seems to happen is the MSM as purveyors of hysteria to the public rely on, and even pay, the police for printable information. What is a disgrace is that the police are unable to resist the pressure.This is why the Levenson inquiry, so far, has been a farce as this has not been looked into. The very fact the the police cannot withstand this pressure and fall willingly into line to be paid, just like the reporters, is the real scandal.

However, let's take heart in the fact that, at last, the police have sacked Ali Dizaei. Again we must say that considering the vast sums of public money spent of first promoting this man, then followed by even more money on botched inquiries into his various offences, this was not a good time to go on the march about the cuts. In many ways this single case encapsulates all that is wrong with the police. It's actually rather funny that the authority responsible for maintaining civil order in society totally failed to be able to deal with one of their own officers. It's worth spending time looking at this case to see just how badly it was dealt with. Altogether it's more police farce than police force, more expensive too. Bring on the cuts!

Footnote -

More on the cuts HERE.