July 2012

The Olympics and the Tour

Two events, compare and contrast

Wiggins and Froome. Wiggins and Froome.
The excitement mounts! The Olympics, what can you say, mind you, are we allowed to use that word? It's fair to point out that this blog has been lukewarm from the start. In May 2008 we wrote this and not of word written all that time ago would we alter. The Olympic venues are all so distant from here it takes a London based reporter, and most of them are in London, to bring the story to life. This was done in a very dramatic way by the Spectator . The paper edition of the magazine carried an article by Nick Cohen which Fraser Nelson reviewed online. The basic point to note here is that Parliament passed the legislation making what Cohen calls ‘corporatist dystopia’ possible. Despite all the hog-wash from Tony Blair and Ken Livingstone local people were not only ignored in the negotiations but now find themselves taken for granted as well.

It's a weak excuse, not a reason for the aggressive logo protection moves, that sponsors have put large sums of money into the Olympic games and so deserve some form of protection. However, the UK public had no option, no chance to debate and the amount of public money spent on the games is an even larger sum, but who speaks for them?

Zombies, everywhere!

And not just in banks, but throughout business and government!

As the sign says!As the sign says!
If you are looking for 'growth', that something promised by politicians but, so far, yet to appear then you will also be disappointed by the world of business. Recently the Daily Telegraph ran this article. And very interesting too, for a number of reasons. The basic information comes from the accountants Ernst and Young with direct quotes from Alan Hudson and Alan Bloom. The summary of which is -

that the financial crisis had created an environment where it is "too difficult to fail", with businesses being kept afloat to the detriment of the broader economy.

That's the sort of tease remark the man atop the Clapham Omnibus could savour, 'common knowledge', his every day language, has long held that there's something funny about the business world. Could this be it? E & Y go on to add -

so-called "financially undead" companies are clinging on, despite the recession, making markets and the economy inefficient. The expected jump in the number of companies falling into administration has not materialised

Then the article points the finger at the banks suggesting that they are 'under pressure'.